How to motivate yourself to change if you're sucked into Groundhog Day

How do you know when Groundhog Day has arrived?

This is not the same as a measured rhythm of life. Routine is not always a bad thing. Some people, on the contrary, are comfortable with a clear schedule, stability, and predictability. Here are some signs that you are stuck in Groundhog Day.

Every day is the same as the previous day, and it makes you sad.

You want change, but you lack the strength to change something in your life.

You are always in a depressed mood.

You are not happy with what you are doing, and what people surround you.

You do not see any prospects, do not know where to go next and how to break the numb routine.

What can help you pull yourself out of Groundhog Day?

Here are some ideas.

 

Finish unfinished business.

Letters that need to finally be sent, papers that need to be filed, closets that need to be sorted, and dentists that need to make appointments all quietly drain the energy out of you. Unfinished business weighs on your shoulders, whispers guilt, pulls you down, and prevents you from moving.

 

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Every day it's the same: you only have enough energy to get from home to work and back, cook, take care of the kids and perform a few other basic functions. And on the other hand, to try something new, there are no resources, although you really want to dilute the usual routine, even if just a little.

 

This means that you are stuck in a "Groundhog Day". The good news is that you can get out of it.

 

How do you know when Groundhog Day is upon you?

This is not the same as a measured rhythm of life. Routine is not always a bad thing. Some people, on the contrary, are comfortable with a clear schedule, stability and predictability. Here are some signs that you are bogged down in Groundhog Day.

 

Every day is the same as the one before, and it makes you sad.

You want change, but you don't have the energy to make changes in your life.

You are in a depressed mood all the time.

You are not happy with what you are doing, and what people surround you.

You do not see any prospects, do not know where to go next and how to break the numb routine.

What can help you pull yourself out of Groundhog Day?

Here are some ideas.

 

Finish unfinished business.

Letters that need to finally be sent, papers that need to be filed, closets that need to be sorted, and dentists that need to make appointments all quietly drain the energy out of you. Unfinished business puts a heavy burden on your shoulders, whispers guilt, pulls you down and prevents you from moving.

 

It is a vicious circle: old unclosed tasks do not allow you to set goals and do something new. Try to slowly, in small steps, finish what you started. Make a list of all the issues that are waiting for your attention. Start with the easiest - the ones that take the least time: making a phone call, writing a letter, taking things to the dry cleaner.

 

When you manage to do something, cross it out: it feels good, lifts your spirits, and helps you believe in yourself. Once you cross out all the old tasks, you will have the space and inspiration to take on something new.

Write down everything you do during the day.

Do a thorough audit of your daily tasks. Include everything you do, from brushing your teeth to reading before bed. Don't ignore even very small and seemingly insignificant tasks like washing the dishes or taking your child to school.Then look carefully at the list you have and think about what can be removed from it. Perhaps some tasks can be delegated to family members or special services, and others can be abandoned.

 

For example, instead of going to the store on their own, try to make a delivery: it will cost the same, but will save a couple of hours a week. Or try to spend less time in meaningless surfing on the Internet: it gives little, but takes away precious minutes and drains your energ

 

Even if it seems to you that all of your work is extremely important and necessary, most likely you will be able to free up at least an hour or two a wee

 

Write down everything you want to d

Go dancing? Learn English? Play the ukulele? Grow bonsai? Make a list of all the things you've always wanted to do. Don't think about how practical these activities and hobbies are, whether they'll be useful, and whether they'll fit into your schedule. If you think it will be interesting and fun, feel free to put the activity on your list

 

The very process of making it is very encouraging, uplifting, empowering, and motivating..o.k.y.

How to motivate yourself to change if you're sucked into Groundhog Day

 

Life

A couple of lists can help you break out of your boring routine.

How to motivate yourself to change if you're sucked into Groundhog Day

 

3

Every day it's the same: you only have enough energy to get from home to work and back, cook, take care of the kids and perform a few other basic functions. And on the other hand, to try something new, there are no resources, although you really want to dilute the usual routine, even if just a little.

 

This means that you are stuck in a "Groundhog Day". The good news is that you can get out of it.

 

How do you know when Groundhog Day is upon you?

This is not the same as a measured rhythm of life. Routine is not always a bad thing. Some people, on the contrary, are comfortable with a clear schedule, stability and predictability. Here are some signs that you are bogged down in Groundhog Day.

 

Every day is the same as the one before, and it makes you sad.

You want change, but you don't have the energy to make changes in your life.

You are in a depressed mood all the time.

You are not happy with what you are doing, and what people surround you.

You do not see any prospects, do not know where to go next and how to break the numb routine.

What can help you pull yourself out of Groundhog Day?

Here are some ideas.

 

Finish unfinished business.

Letters that need to finally be sent, papers that need to be filed, closets that need to be sorted out, and dentists that need to make an appointment all quietly drain the energy out of you. Unfinished business puts a heavy burden on your shoulders, whispers guilt, pulls you down and prevents you from moving.

 

It is a vicious circle: old unclosed tasks do not allow you to set goals and do something new. Try to slowly, in small steps, finish what you started. Make a list of all the issues that are waiting for your attention. Start with the easiest - the ones that take the least time: making a phone call, writing a letter, taking things to the dry cleaner.

 

When you manage to do something, cross it out: it feels good, lifts your spirits, and helps you believe in yourself. Once you cross out all the old tasks, you'll have the space and inspiration to take on something new.

 

You'll benefit from.

📝

The 8 best services for making lists

Write down everything you do during the day.

Do a thorough audit of your daily tasks. Include everything you do, from brushing your teeth to reading before bed. Don't ignore even the very small and seemingly insignificant things like washing the dishes or taking your child to school.

 

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Then take a close look at the list you have and think about what you can take away from it. Perhaps some activities can be delegated to family members or special services, and others can be abandoned.

 

For example, instead of going to the store on their own, try to make a delivery: it will cost the same, but will save a couple of hours a week. Or try to spend less time in meaningless surfing on the Internet: it gives little, but takes away precious minutes and drains your energy.

 

Even if it seems to you that all of your work is extremely important and necessary, most likely you will be able to free up at least an hour or two a week.

 

Write down everything you want to do.

Go dancing? Learn English? Play the ukulele? Grow bonsai? Make a list of all the things you've always wanted to do. Don't think about how practical these activities and hobbies are, whether they'll be useful, and whether they'll fit into your schedule. If you think it will be interesting and fun, feel free to put the activity on your list.

 

The very process of putting it together is very encouraging, uplifting, empowering and motivating.

Fill in the blanks.

When you're done with your list, pick one most-interesting activity - one that you're ready to get started on right now. Maybe it will be a tai-bo class, or maybe clay molding or a sewing class.

 

Now take a look at your updated daily schedule, where the little empty windows have appeared. And put the new class in them. Let you have only 20 free minutes a day - no big deal. Even 20 minutes spent on a fun and happy activity will help dilute the routine, lift your spirits and motivate you to new goals. After all, one positive change often pulls others.

 

And do not forget that the free time you can just spend on vacation: take a nap, lie on the couch with a book, sit on the lawn in the park. This, too, is important for your psychological comfort.

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