Researchers find out why carbohydrates are especially important for women

Poor diet is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death among women. According to a new study by scientists from Monash University, Australia, women can reduce their chances of heart and vascular disease by increasing the percentage of slow carbohydrates in their diet.

Β The study involved 9,899 women aged 50-55 who were followed for 15 years. The participants were divided into several groups depending on the amount of carbohydrates and saturated fat in the diet. The scientists' results showed that moderate carbohydrate consumption (41% to 44% of total food intake) was associated with the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease. While women whose diets had less than 37% of carbohydrates had a higher risk.

In addition, the researchers found that increased saturated fat intake was not associated with cardiovascular disease or mortality among women, but was correlated with a lower likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. These results contradict many epidemiological studies that have supported an association between saturated fat and cardiovascular disease.

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"The debate over the best diet to prevent the development of heart disease continues unabated, and reducing fat in the diet has always been our primary recommendation for preventing cardiovascular disease. But the main problem with our dietary recommendations is that many of the dietary trials have predominantly involved men. We need further research to tailor our dietary recommendations to each gender",Β - says Sarah Zaman, lead author of the study.

To reduce the risk of heart and vascular problems, experts recommend including in your diet high-quality carbohydrate products, such as whole-grain bread, cereals, pasta from durum wheat, etc. They also recommend eating more vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, avocados, olives, and protein foods such as fish, seafood, eggs, beans, lentils, etc.

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