Shares of Moderna rose 6% on the background of the final approval of the vaccine in the United States

The American biotech company Moderna has received full permission to use its COVID-19 vaccine in the United States for adults from the American regulator. Investors reacted by buying shares.

The American biotech company Moderna has received full permission to use its COVID-19 vaccine in the United States for adults from the American regulator. Investors reacted by buying shares.

Shares of the American pharmaceutical company Moderna rose by 5.9% at the moment, to $168.88 per security, amid the final approval of the coronavirus vaccine under the Spikevax brand in the United States. By 20:30 Moscow time, the company's securities partially lost their growth, falling to $ 164.8. This is evidenced by the trading data of the NASDAQ exchange.

The biotech company's securities have grown after the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) fully approved the Moderna vaccine against COVID-19 for people aged 18 and older.

Prior to that, the vaccine had the status of approved for emergency use, which it received after the FDA's decision in December 2020. Previously, the vaccine has already been approved for use in Canada, Japan, the European Union, the United Kingdom and Israel. According to Moderna, 807 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine were delivered worldwide in 2021. Approximately 25% of these doses were sent to low- and middle-income countries. Sales of the vaccine in 2021 brought Moderna approximately $17.5 billion.

The Moderna vaccine has become the second fully approved coronavirus vaccine in the United States. The first American regulators approved a vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech, which is produced using a similar technology. It was approved last year for people aged 16 and older.

This year, the company expects record sales of $18.5 billion due to contracts already concluded, potential additional purchases of the vaccine could bring the company another $3.5 billion.

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