The most dangerous islands on Earth

Ilha da Queimada

 

Ilha da Queimada, commonly known as Snake Island, is located off the Brazilian coast and is home to golden spear-headed vipers - and no one else. Vipers, by the way, are not just spear-headed, but also some of the most poisonous in the world. Once there was a lighthouse and a keeper lived there, but then the command of the Brazilian navy forbade the civilian population to appear on the island. The vipers, of course, were not covered by the order.

 

 

The most dangerous islands on Earth

When a travel agent asks you to choose a vacation paradise, check to see if one of them is on the list.

Elijah da Queimada

 

Ilha da Quemada, colloquially "Snake Island," is located off the Brazilian coast and is inhabited by golden spear-headed vipers - and no one else. Vipers, by the way, are not just spear-headed, but also some of the most poisonous in the world. Once there was a lighthouse and a keeper lived there, but then the command of the Brazilian navy forbade the civilian population to appear on the island. The vipers, of course, were not covered by the order.

 

Miyakejima

 

When Japanese people get bored with floods and nuclear power plant accidents, the Oyama Volcano on Miyakejima Island comes into play. It regularly spews a unique mixture of ash and poisonous gas, and islanders have to wear cotton gauze bandages. The eruptions are often combined with earthquakes of up to magnitude 4, from which even bandages don't help.

 

Saba

 

Holland hasn't had much luck with the colonies. On the tiny island of Saba, which belongs to it, where it would seem that God wanted to arrange a glamorous resort, it did not succeed. Over the past 150 years, the island more often than any other in the region became the spoils of hurricanes: 15 typhoons looked here of the third category and 7 of the fifth. Which category is better? It doesn't matter: even a one-star hotel here would be sheer recklessness.

 

Bikini

 

Bikini Atoll is recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but belatedly. In 1946 the entire local population was evicted to a neighboring island and nuclear and hydrogen weapons testing began there. 1,865 of the 7,000 natives became official victims of the nuclear program as a result, and half of them died of various diseases. Not long ago, radiation levels were extremely high, but as of this year, access to the island is once again permitted. But because the fishing industry has so far been curtailed, there are an unimaginable number of sharks off its shores. And what additional capabilities they have acquired as a result of mutations, the newly arrived divers will soon find out.

 

Gruinyard

 

The uninhabited island of Gruinyard was made even more uninhabitable by the British government when it tested biological weapons there during World War II. "What atrocity!" - Dr. Goebbels would probably have said, upon learning that the British had used a particularly successful strain of anthrax to decimate several hundred sheep alone. After that, a quarantine was declared on the island, and the anthrax was never useful: instead, the Hitlerites had to deal with ordinary Red Army soldiers, who are known to have done just as well.

 

The Farallon Islands

 

From 1946 to 1970, the sea near the Farallon Islands was used as a dumping ground for radioactive waste. About 47,500 steel barrels of this stuff ended up at the bottom, but no one really remembers where. What harm to the environment they caused is also not very clear. All we know for sure is that it is more dangerous to try to extract them than to do nothing. Yes, in addition, because of the large number of elephant seals, an impressive number of white sharks like to hunt here.

 

Ramri Island

 

This island off the coast of Burma made history with a story. In 1945, after a bloody battle with the British, about 400 Japanese fighters retreated to the lagoons that line the island's coast. There they were attacked from the rear by saltwater crocodiles, which made the task of the British much easier. The Guinness Book of World Records calls the event "the greatest damage done to humans by animals.

 

Danger Island

 

This islet to the south of the Maldives made our list simply because of its intimidating name. And the name stuck to it because in the old days it was not very convenient to dock here.

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